Agencies

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A foreign recruitment agency cannot supply foreign contractors directly to a Swiss company. It must gi through a Swiss recruitment agency whic has a federal (international) placement licence. Leora Human Capital holds a federal placement licence valid to work with every EU/EFTA countries and therefor can be your preferred partner to introduce permanent employees from abroad to Swiss companies. We also have partnerships with well established Swiss labour leasing companies to lease your contractors.

In Switzerland, private sector recruitment is an activity governed by the Federal Act of 6 October 1989 on Recruitment and the Hiring of Services.

Under this Act, recruitment agencies established outside Swiss territory are not authorized to recruit for jobs in Switzerland. Neither are they allowed to recruit job seekers in Switzerland for jobs abroad.

Agencies established outside Swiss territory involved in recruitment activities with relevance to Switzerland are liable to fines of up to CHF 100'000. In addition, any persons who, in their capacity as an employer, should have recourse to the services of a non-authorized agency are liable to fines of up to CHF 40'000.

Leora Human Capital holds a valid licence to place workers from Switzerland and all EU/EFTA countries.

Agencies established outside Swiss territory still have the possibility to legitimate their business in Switzerland by partnering with a Swiss recruitment agency in possession of a valid federal license to place personnel. Leora holds both the cantonal and federal authorizations to place personnel into Swiss companies and can propose you solutions to place your consultants into Swiss companies with 100% compliance guaranteed.

We provide legal advice and ensure agency commissions are paid without delay. Please contact us at info@leorahc.com for detailed explanations.

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Switzerland agrees banking transparency

Switzerland agrees banking transparency

Jan 1, 2017

The international convention on the automatic sharing of banking information entered into force on January 1. This announces the beginning of the end of the country’s reputation as a tax haven. Such automatic information exchanges are aimed at bringing an end to Switzerland's long-cherished banking secrecy practices and help prevent foreigners from stashing undeclared income in Swiss banks.

The Swiss parliament is meanwhile expected to give the green light before the end of the year to similar accords with Iceland, Norway, Japan, Canada, South Korea and the British crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man.

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Will it be easier for young foreigners to become Swiss?

Will it be easier for young foreigners to become Swiss?

Jan 1, 2017

Young foreigners up to the age of 25 who were born in Switzerland and have been to school for five years in the country are eligible for the facilitated naturalisation. The requirement is that one of their parents must be Swiss-born and has to have spent at least ten years in the country. In addition, one of the grandparents must have had a resident’s permit.
If all of these conditions are met, a foreigner can apply for a passport under a legal amendment.
The decision by the Senate is the latest stage in eight years of debate on a proposal by a Social Democratic parliamentarian. The House of Representatives has already approved the amendments.

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